Sevletunet

As our trip made its way from Denmark across the North Sea, we continued our journey into Norway through a place called Sevletunet. When I booked this farm stay, I thought it was just a bed and breakfast. However, we found out the next day that the farm had been there for many hundreds of years and is in fact a historical Norwegian landmark!

Our wonderful host Gro happily gave us a tour and some history of the farm. We started with the Sevleloftet, the two story log house on pillars. Built around 1630, it is one of only three left nationwide and is regarded as one of the finest examples in Norway. Houses such as these were built as far back as the Viking Age. The top floor has three bedrooms with the doorways decorated with runes and carvings symbolising various protective elements, and the first floor for food storage.

The Sevlelåven, or barn, is from 1632 and is one of the two oldest preserved barns in Norway. It also happens to be a scheduled national monument. It is believed that people have been living on the site of Sevletunet since the early Iron Age and it could go back even further than that.

The story of how Gro’s family came to own the property is better than any novel! A young man, the Sevle Boy, once lived on the farm. He was a Robin Hood type of character and use to give what he could to help the poor in the area. However, one day he was desperate and due to his own economic problems, stole in order to help the people. But he was caught, And even though the people he had helped tried to help him in return by putting him in hiding, he thought the honourable thing to do was confess.  As a result, he and his family had to leave the farm. He later went to his death as punishment.

The farm was then sold and Gro’s family settled there in the 1830’s. The house was used as a post office and telephone exchange for a while and the spirit of the Sevle Boy lives on. The farm was offered as a refuge to those who needed it, during the war, gypsies needing a place to stay and now we are all welcome to stay in this wonderful and historical place in its current state as a B&B.

You can visit and stay at Sevletunet yourself. It’s near the town of Rødberg.  To read more visit: http://en.sevletunet.no


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Skills: Norway